Interviewer: After so many stories about death and darkness, your story “Potential” ends Score with the hope and joy of birth and infinite possibilities. How does Aspasia’s decision to revive a once-living human exemplify these two emotions more so than the creation of a new one? Would the story have ended differently if you hadn’t been assigned ‘hope’ and ‘joy’?

Felicity Drake: The story emerged from the themes of ‘hope’ and ‘joy,’ and I can’t imagine it ending differently.

From the beginning, I knew that the story would be about birth, and I liked the idea of pairing birth with archaeology: death, extinction, sorting through bones. When you study the past, it’s possible to want the best for people long dead, or at least to want to do your best for them. I wanted to make a world where that kind of hope could be fulfilled.

Interviewer: Did your talent for music/art/dance/etc. help you develop your story’s emotional cue when the writer part of you got stuck?

Felicity Drake: One of my concerns in writing a story to the wonderfully sunny cues of hope and joy was that it might come out too one-note. It was a help to remember that I was permitted the occasional key change or foray into a relative minor!

Interviewer: After finishing your story, what was the single most valuable take-away from the experience?

Felicity Drake: Less is more! One of the most valuable things I learned was during the editing process. We ended up cutting out a whole scene from the beginning of the story, and I was amazed at how much the story was improved just by trimming the excess.

Interviewer: Given that this is a “score” anthology, what representative piece of music would you connect to “Potential”?

Felicity Drake: “Sunday Morning,” from Benjamin Britten’s Sea Interludes from Peter Grimes!

Visit Felicity Drake’s author website and Twitter @DrakeFelicity.

Buy the Score anthology, which includes Felicity Drake’s story “Potential”, focused on Hope and Joy.


Leave a Reply